2 March 2016

Fungi of Staines Moor - Part 1

Over the last year I've been photographing as many species of fungi as I can find on Staines Moor, in order to get familiar with the more common species, and I'm amazed by the diversity. Identification is generally very difficult and it's been a steep learning curve, but so far I've manage to positively identify the following species.

Woodland species


Three sides of Staines Moor are bordered by water courses - the River Wraysbury on the west, Bonehead Ditch on the east and part of the north, and Yeoveney Ditch in the north-west. The dominant tree species around the boundary is the water-loving Crack Willow Salix fragilis, on which most of the woodland fungi were found.

Fairy Inkcap Coprinus disseminatus, 18 September 2015. A species found fruiting on wood in 'swarms', this group was feeding on a
Crack Willow Salix fragilis along the River Wraysbury.

Sulphur Tuft Hypholoma fasciculare, 18 September 2015 - a very common poisonous species in Britain. This group was feeding on
Crack Willow Salix fragilis along the River Wraysbury

Sulphur Tuft Hypholoma fasciculare, 18 September 2015

Glistening Inkcap Coprinellus micaceus, 18 September 2015, on Crack Willow Salix fragilis. The caps lose the small white granules
and open out from egg-shaped to bell-shaped as they age (see below).

Glistening Inkcap Coprinellus micaceus, 18 September 2015, on Crack Willow Salix fragilis. Some older specimens showing
the difference in appearance compared with above.

Southern Bracket Ganoderma australe, on Crack Willow Salix fragilis beside the River Wraysbury (all pics taken on 23 December
2015 except bottom right on 29 December 2015)

Willow Bracket Phellinus igniarius, Bonehead woodland, 7 March 2015

Turkeytail Trametes versicolor, 18 September 2015, on Crack Willow
Salix fragilis beside the River Wraysbury

Jelly Ear Auricularia auricula-judae, old railway, 23 December 2015

Yellow Brain Fungus Tremella mesenterica, old railway, 23 December 2015

Lemon Disco/Yellow Fairy Cups Bisporella citrina on dead wood, old railway, 23 December 2015

Beech Barkspot Diatrype disciformis, along Bonehead Woodland, 29 December 2015

Grassland species


The ancient alluvial meadows at Staines Moor consist of semi-improved neutral grassland and swampy grassland. The site has never been farmed, meaning no fertilisers or pesticides have been applied to the land here and grazing has taken place here since 1065. Many species of fungi feed on the nutrients from cow and horse dung.

Parasol Mushroom Macrolepiota procera, (all pics taken 24 October 2015 except top right on 23 September 2015)

Silky Pinkgill Entoloma sericeum, 4 December 2015

Field Blewit Lepista saeva, 11 November 2015

Petticoat Mottlegill Panaeolus papilionaceus var papilionaceus, 1 November
2015

Petticoat Mottlegill Panaeolus papilionaceus var papilionaceus, 1 November 2015

Egghead Mottlegill Panaeolus papilionaceus, 1 November 2015

Egghead Mottlegill Panaeolus semiovatus, 4 December 2015

Dung Roundhead Protostropharia semiglobata (left 9 September 2015, right top and bottom 11 November 2015)

Yellow Fieldcap Bolbitius titubans, 1 November 2015. The fruit body of this species only lasts a few hours.

Orange Mosscap Rickenella fibula, 1 November 2015

Snowy Inkcap Coprinopsis nivea, 1 November 2015

Meadow Puffball Vascellum pratense, 20 November 2015

Got more species photographed that I've yet to identify that I will post when I've made further progress.

1 comment:

  1. Good luck with all of this Lee. The harder that I looked at fungi the more difficult it became. A minefield!

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